100 Years of Enriching Our Communities

Rich Gartlemann Bio PictureRich Gartelmann, CFP®
Senior Vice President and Head of Wealth Management

This year marks a milestone for our wealth management group: 100 years of offering the services and guidance that family legacies are built on. The services we offer, and the sophistication of the advice you receive, have changed dramatically over that time. What started out as an offering of traditional trust services has evolved to cover more than just the needs of the wealthy few. Today, we offer services that help people of all ages and financial circumstances build and sustain their wealth over their lifetimes and often well beyond.

What Are Trust Services, Anyway?
While these days, we—along with most banks and financial companies—use the broader and more accurate term of “wealth management” to describe what we do, providing traditional trust services remains fundamental to that.

Trust services involve more than just managing money and providing investment recommendations. Our role in our clients’ lives, or those of their loved ones, is defined by a legal agreement: a trust document. That role is legally binding and may include holding and accounting for assets as a fiduciary, managing an estate’s assets after a client’s death and providing heirs (including charities) with a steady income stream.

In many cases, we serve as the trustee of an estate, or co-trustee with a family member, and oversee the distribution or sale of assets—from homes, boats and securities to farmland, family businesses and paintings. Depending on an agreement, or sometimes by court order, we may be asked to perform as a legal guardian for those clients who no longer feel confident they can manage their finances alone or those unable to make sound decisions for themselves. In these cases, we make sure bills are being paid on time and service providers are engaged when needed.

The services we provide each client or family are customized to their situation and needs as well as the directions outlined in their trust agreement. Taking on such a big role within a family requires us to be unbiased and focused on the best interests of all involved. It also requires us to function as fiduciaries. That means, legally, we can’t put our company or our individual career interests above those of our clients. Nor, have we. Trust services literally require a high level of trust in your wealth managers. In that respect, nothing much has changed over the past 100 years.

What Has Changed
The biggest change since we added the “& Trust” to our name in 1919 is the degree to which technology has enabled us to do so much more for so many more clients, their families and even their companies.

Today, through River Street Advisors, we offer financial planning and investments services to help you build your wealth, along with our traditional wealth management services. We also help many business owners in our communities offer retirement plans to their employees so they can save and build for their own futures.

Manage over 1,000 accounts. With a market value over 1 Billion dollars.

Helping people at the most personal level of their lives plan for and live out their futures—and then see future generations do the same–is what wealth management is all about. As a group, we look forward to being part of the continuum of wealth managers that will be doing just that for the next 100 years.

For more information on how we can help you shape your future and family legacy, visit us here or call 630-906-2000. We can’t wait to talk to you about the plans you have.

River Street Advisors, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Old Second National Bank is a registered investment adviser and only transacts business in states where it is properly registered, or is excluded or exempted from registration requirements. All investment strategies have the potential for profit or loss. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that any specific investment or strategy will be suitable or profitable for a client’s investment portfolio. There are no assurances that an investor’s portfolio will match or exceed any particular benchmark.

Not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; Not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, the depository financial institution; Subject to investment risks, including possible loss of principal amount invested.

China deal, Border wall: Wealth Economic Update Feb. 15, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • Trade negotiations with China continue to grow increasingly optimistic after a week of constructive talks between the United States and China. Chinese President Xi Jinping has announced that negotiations will resume in Washington next week and President Trump suggested that he would consider pushing back the March 1st deadline if progress was being made. U.S. trade negotiator Robert Lighthizer said “We feel that we have to make headway on some very, very important and very difficult issues” and that he was “hopeful” of progress. As it stands, if no deal is made before March 1st, tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods would be raised to 25%. China’s trade surplus with the United States fell 42% to $27.3 billion last month, the lowest since May 2018.
  • iStock-173950266_370The White house has reached a tentative budget agreement that includes a $1.38 billion border security deal that would prevent another government shutdown. The compromise detailed funds for 55 new miles of barriers along the border in Texas and passed the House 300 to 128 and the Senate 83 to 16. After signing the deal, President Trump hosted a televised announcement in the Rose Garden where he stated that he would sign a declaration of a national emergency at the border. This would give the government access to billions of dollars to fund the construction of the full border wall.


Markets

  • Stocks extended the rally with a very strong week. The S&P 500 jumped 2.56% and closed at 2,776. The Dow Jones rose 3.20% and closed at 25,883. Year to date, the S&P is up 11.00% and the Dow Jones is up 11.35%.
  • Yields rose this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.49% and 2.66%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil rose sharply this week. Prices jumped 5.84% and closed at $55.80 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 22.88%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 0.62% this week and closed at $1,322.49 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 3.12%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims rose by 4,000 to 239,000 for the week. The four-week moving average of claims rose by 7,000 to 232,000. Claims rose in Washington by 4,000 and in New York by 2,000.
  • Retail sales plunged 1.2% in December versus expectations for a gain of 0.1%.
  • Core retail sales fell by 1.7% versus expectations for a 0.4% gain.
  • The producer price index (PPI) fell by 0.1% in January versus expectations for an increase of 0.1%. This was led by declines in energy and food.
  • The consumer price index (CPI) was flat in January versus expectations for a 0.1% increase.
  • The core CPI measure rose 0.2%, in-line with expectations.
  • Industrial production fell by 0.6% in January versus expectations for a 0.1%. increase.
  • Manufacturing production fell by 0.9% in January versus expectations for a flat reading.
  • The University of Michigan’s index of consumer sentiment came in at 95.5 in February versus expectations for a reading of 93.7.

Fact of the Week

  • On the day that Janet Yellen was sworn in as Fed Chair (2/03/14), the S&P 500 was down 2.3%(total return), the worst trading day for the index in 2014. On the day that Jerome Powell was sworn in as Fed Chair (2/05/18), the S&P 500 was down 4.1%(total return), the worst trading day for the index in 2018 (source: BTN Research).

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

China deal, Venezuela protests: Wealth Economic Update Feb. 8, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • As the March 1st deadline for a trade truce between the United States and China approaches, the chances for a trade deal to be made are growing much smaller. White House Economic Advisor Larry Kudlow stated this week that a “pretty sizable distance” remains between the two sides. President Trump followed up on Larry Kudlow’s comment by announcing that he will not be meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping before March 1st. These comments from the White House have arisen following a few weeks of renewed optimism over trade negotiations, changing the tone ahead of the deadline. President Trump is set to sign an executive order next week that would ban Chinese telecom equipment from United States wireless networks in an effort to combat cyber threats.
  • CARACAS-500750930Western nations continue to push for the resignation of socialist leader Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela as hundreds of thousands of protestors blanketed the streets of Caracas last weekend. The protestors are in support of self-proclaimed President Juan Guaido. The United States has announced that military intervention in Venezuela is an option and have placed extreme sanctions on the country and the state owned oil firm PDVSA, whose 2026 maturity debt is now trading at 23.75 cents on the dollar. The new sanctions have crippled the liquidity on Venezuelan sovereign debt and has caused JPMorgan to consider removing the securities from its popular emerging-market bond indexes. This action would force the largest holders of Venezuelan sovereign debt to sell in a market where it is unclear if there is any buying interest for the securities.


Markets

  • Stocks continued rallying this week before retreating in the second half of the week over concerns of slowing global growth and U.S China trade. The S&P 500 gained 0.11% and closed at 2,708. The Dow Jones increased 0.32% and closed at 25,106. Year to date, the S&P is up 8.24% and the Dow Jones is up 7.90%.
  • Yields declined further this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.44% and 2.63%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil dropped this week over concerns of growing supply. Prices fell 4.60% and closed at $52.72 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 16.10%.
  • The spot price of Gold fell 0.30% this week and closed at $1,314.08 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 2.46%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims fell by 19,000 to 234,000 for the week. The four-week moving average of claims rose by 5,000 to 225,000. Claims fell by 3,000 in Florida and New Jersey.
  • Factory orders fell by 0.6% in November versus expectations for a small increase.
  • The ISM non-manufacturing index fell to 56.7 versus expectations for a reading of 57.1.
  • The trade balance for November fell $6.4 billion to -$49.3 billion versus expectations for a reading of -$54.0 billion.

Fact of the Week

  • 27% of millennials surveyed in July 2018 spend more money on coffee per month than they put away and invest for retirement (Source: Lendedu)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

China deal, Venezuela oil, Brexit: Wealth Economic Update Feb. 1, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • china-945440206_370President Trump is optimistic that the world’s two largest economies could reach “the biggest deal ever made” and confirmed that a U.S. delegation will visit China in mid-February for a new round of trade talks. The feeling is mutual. China’s trade delegation said the latest negotiations with the U.S. in Washington made “important progress” and focused on three key themes – “trade, structural issues and enforcement.”
  • Despite the rhetoric between Nicolas Maduro and President Trump, U.S. refineries are still buying Venezuelan petroleum. But with the crisis escalating after Washington backed opposition leader Juan Guaido, a new round of sanctions is expected in the coming days. The U.S. on Saturday called on the world to “pick a side” on Venezuela and urged countries to financially disconnect from the Maduro government. “The U.S. has decided to follow the path of stealing Citgo from Venezuela,” President Nicolas Maduro declared after the Trump administration imposed sanctions on its parent company – state-owned oil giant PDVSA. While the sanctions will hit Citgo, the penalties will have a minimal effect on other American refiners, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.
  • In an attempt to break the deadlock over Brexit, Theresa May will seek legally binding changes from the EU regarding the Irish backstop, lawmaker Boris Johnson wrote in The Telegraph, citing senior government sources. “If the PM secures a ‘Freedom Clause’ – for the U.K. to escape the backstop without reference to the bloc – I have no doubt that she will have the whole country full-throatedly behind her.”


Markets

  • • Stocks had a good week following comments from the Fed. The S&P 500 gained 1.62% and closed at 2,706.53. The Dow Jones increased 1.33% and closed at 25,063.89. Year to date, the S&P is up 8.12% and the Dow Jones is up 7.56%.
  • Yields fell again week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.51% and 2.69%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil extended its gains this week. Prices rose 6.39% and closed at $55.31 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 20.98%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 0.99% this week and closed at $1,318.21 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 2.79%.

Economic Data

  • Sales of new single-family homes sharply rebounded 16.9% in November to a seasonally-adjusted annualized rate of 657k units, significantly above expectations. November sales increased month-over-month in three of four regions, with the largest increase in the South (+64k) that likely reflected a rebound following Hurricane Michael.
  • The FOMC left the funds rate target range unchanged, as universally expected. The post-meeting statement continued to describe job gains and household spending as “strong” but downgraded its characterization of overall growth to “solid”.
  • The Conference Board index of consumer confidence declined 6.4pt to 120.2 in January, an 18-month low and against consensus expectations for a more modest decrease. The decline reflected a large decrease in the household expectations sub-index (-10.4pt to 87.3) and a small decrease in the household perceptions of present economic conditions sub-index (-0.3pt to 169.6).

Fact of the Week

  • In preparation of the Super Bowl, it is anticipated that Americans will consume 100 million pounds of guacamole. At an average weight of 150 grams per avocado, this equates to over 300 million avocados. (Source: Produce News)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

Shutdown, Wall: Wealth Economic Update Jan. 25, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • laguardia-898593448President Trump reached a deal with congress today to open and fund the government until February 15th. The hundreds of thousands of furloughed federal workers during the 34 day partial government shutdown are expected to receive back pay. The bill that was agreed upon does not include $5.7 billion for a border wall. President Trump stated that if there is no agreement on border wall funding by February 15th, either the government will shut down again, or he will take executive action to provide funds. This announcement today comes after two bills failed to pass the senate yesterday, and the unscheduled absences of Transportations Security Agents caused a brief ground stop a LaGuardia airport in New York this morning.


Markets

  • Stocks were relatively unchanged from last week, in another volatile week. The S&P 500 declined 0.21% and closed at 2,665. The Dow Jones increased 0.13% and closed at 24,737. Year to date, the S&P is up 6.40% and the Dow Jones is up 6.15%.
  • Yields retreated slightly from last week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.60% and 2.76%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil continued trending higher this week. Prices rose 1.02% and closed at $53.55 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 17.93%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 1.80% this week and closed at $1,305.25 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 1.92%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims fell by 14,000 to 199,000 for the week, the lowest level since 1969. The four-week moving average of claims decreased by 6,000 to 215,000. Claims fell by 5,000 in Kentucky and by 4,000 in California and Michigan.
  • Existing home sales fell by 6.4% in December to a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 4.99 million units versus expectations for a decline of 1.5%. Sales in the Midwest region led the decline.

Fact of the Week

  • The average price of gasoline nationwide on 1/18/19 (last Friday) was $2.24. 50 years ago, the average price of gasoline was 35 cents. When adjusted for 50 years of inflation, the 35 cent price is equal to $2.48 in 2019 dollars. (Source: AAA, Department of Labor)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

China, Brexit, Shutdown: Wealth Economic Update Jan. 18, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • beijing-482334184_370China’s chief trade negotiator, Vice Premier Liu He, will come to Washington D.C. for the next round of trade talks on January 30-31. The visit comes after some surprisingly negative economic data coming out of China this week that showed sharp contractions in both imports and exports. The poor numbers have led to stimulus measures such as tax cuts by the People’s Bank of China and figure to make it even more pressing for some sort of deal to be struck. The U.S. side isn’t necessarily presenting a unified front however, with Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin saying that Washington could ease tariffs on China, while U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer pushed back on this suggestion and continues to take a hardline stance.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May submitted a Brexit proposal to Parliament this week which was soundly voted down and prompted a no-confidence motion from the opposition Labour Party. While May was able to survive the no-confidence vote, she now has a Monday deadline to set out her Brexit Plan B. She may be forced budge on certain items to get her opponents on her side, such as keeping closer ties to the European Union or postponing Britain’s separation from the economic bloc. However, with less than 70 days remaining until “Brexit Day”, if the two sides do not come together it becomes more likely that Parliament will take control of the Brexit process.
  • The partial government shutdown carries on through its 28th day, extending the record long impasse. Estimates for the cost of the shutdown have been increased from an initial figure of a -0.1% impact on GDP every two weeks it was in force, to -0.1% every week. The January employment report figures to show job growth being slashed by nearly 500,000 and the headline unemployment rate rising to 4.0% if the situation isn’t resolved quickly.


Markets

  • Stocks rose higher again this week, continuing the bounce off of the Christmas Eve lows. The S&P 500 rose 2.90% and closed at 2,670. The Dow Jones increased 3.01% and closed at 24,706. Year to date, the S&P is up 6.63% and the Dow Jones is up 6.02%.
  • Yields were on the rise this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.62% and 2.78%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil rose sharply this week, continuing its recent upward trend. Prices jumped another 4.17% and closed at $53.74 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 18.28%.
  • The spot price of Gold fell 0.63% this week and closed at $1,282.11 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are unchanged.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims fell by 3,000 to 213,000 for the week. The four-week moving average of claims decreased by 1,000 to 221,000. Claims fell by 3,000 in New York and by 2,000 in Connecticut and Pennsylvania.

Fact of the Week

  • If calendar year 2018 GDP growth, which is released on 1/30, is reported above 3%, it will break a 12 year streak of “sub 3%” growth (2006-2017). This is the longest such streak in US history, with the next longest “sub 3%” streak taking place in the 4 your period from 1930-1933 during the Great Depression. (Source: Commerce Department)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

China, Brexit, Shutdown: Wealth Economic Update Jan. 11, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • The trade negotiation with China shifted to a more positive tone this week after U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stated that the United States and China could reach a deal that “we could live with”. China’s foreign ministry stated that China has “good faith” to work with the United States to reach a deal. Some meaningful progress was made this week during a prolonged meeting that included China’s purchases of U.S. farm and energy products and expanded access to China’s markets. However, negotiations over forced U.S. technology transfer did not improve. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is expected to visit the United States in the near future for further negotiations.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May finds herself in a tough spot in the days leading up to the January 15th vote on her Brexit deal as a result of lawmakers restricting her tax-varying powers in the event of no agreement. The last vote on a Brexit deal was delayed as there was not enough support and things have failed to improve since. The pressure for a deal to be made grows by the day as the March 29th deadline nears.
  • capitol-621851478With no end in sight, the partial government shutdown now ties the record for longest in American history, on its 21st day. Effects of a lengthened government shutdown are forgone pay from millions of federal employees, delayed business permits and visas, delayed IPO’S, and mergers and acquisitions. Withheld pay from federal employees could potentially impact consumer spending, a significant portion of the United States economy. Fitch’s global head of sovereign ratings stated that the United States triple-A credit rating could be in question because of the inability to pass a budget. The two government parties remain at an impasse over President Trump’s request for border wall funding.


Markets

  • • Stocks rose higher again this week as tensions with China have eased and the Fed provided some calming language regarding policy. The S&P 500 rose 2.58% and closed at 2,596. The Dow Jones increased 2.42% and closed at 23,996. Year to date, the S&P is up 3.63% and the Dow Jones is up 2.93%.
  • Yields rose slightly this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.53% and 2.70%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil rose sharply this week. Prices jumped 6.41% and closed at $51.63 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 13.70%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 0.13% this week and closed at $1,287.68 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 0.40%.

Economic Data

  •  Initial jobless claims fell by 17,000 to 216,000 for the week. The four-week moving average of claims rose by 3,000 to 222,000. Claims fell by 3,000 in California and fell by 2,000 in Florida, Illinois, and New Jersey.
  • The ISM non-manufacturing index fell by 3.1 points to 57.6 versus expectations for a reading of 58.5.
  • The consumer price index (CPI) fell by 0.06% in December, in-line with expectations. The year-over-year rate rose 1.95% versus expectations of a 1.9% increase.
    • Core CPI rose by 0.21% in December, in-line with expectations. The year-over-year rate rose by 2.21% in December, in-line with expectations.

Fact of the Week

  • Today marks the 21st day of the government shutdown, which ties the shutdown spanning December 16, 1995 to January 6th, 1996 under President Bill Clinton as the longest shut down in history. During the ’95-’96 shutdown, the S&P 500 returned 0.156%. As of the close today, the S&P 500 is up 7.54% since the government shutdown at midnight on December 22. (Source: Bloomberg)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

China, Congress, Wall, Budget: Wealth Economic Update Jan. 4, 2019

U.S. and World News

  • great_wall-899508826President Trump said that he had a “very good call” with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Saturday regarding trade and that “big progress” was being made. Earlier this week, China released disappointing manufacturing data that showed a contracting Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index, rather than growing. However, Chinese Services Purchasing Managers Index jumped to a six-month high. This morning, China’s commerce ministry announced that vice-ministerial-level trade discussions will be held with the United States on January 7-8 in Beijing. The meeting is a continuation of an ongoing effort to reach a deal on trade during a 90-day truce period that postponed additional tariffs until March 1st.
  • Democrats had officially taken control of the House on Thursday and have found themselves at an impasse with Congress and President Trump on funding the government, which has now been partially shut down for 14 days. President Trump has stated that he will not sign a bill that does not include $5 billion for a wall along the southern border, something that the Democrats strongly oppose. The Democrats have passed a funding package that would reopen the government and the Department of Homeland Security until February 8th, but would not satisfy the President’s demand. Bipartisan congressional leaders are meeting today at the White House to continue negotiations.


Markets

  • Stocks continued climbing higher in yet another volatile week. The S&P 500 rose 1.90% and closed at 2,532. The Dow Jones increased 1.65% and closed at 23,433. Year to date, the S&P is up 1.03% and the Dow Jones is up 0.50%.
  • Yields fell further this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.50% and 2.67%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil rebounded this week. Prices jumped 6.57% and closed at $48.31 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are up 6.39%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 0.42% this week and closed at $1,286.05 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 0.28%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims rose by 10,000 to 231,000 for the week. The four-week moving average of claims rose by 1,000 to 219,000. Claims rose by 2,000 in Connecticut and fell by 2,000 in California and North Carolina.
  • Private sector employment rose by 271,000 in December versus expectations for a 180,000 increase.
  • The ISM manufacturing index fell 5.2 points to 54.1 in December versus expectations for a reading of 57.5. This is the largest one-month decline in ten years.
  • Nonfarm payrolls rose by 312,000 in December, far exceeding expectations of 195,000. Prior months were revised up by a net 58,000.
    • The unemployment rate rose 0.2% to 3.9% due to a higher labor participation rate.
    • Average hourly earnings rose by 0.4% in December versus expectations for a 0.3% increase and the year-over-year rate rose to 3.2%, a cycle high.

Fact of the Week

  • This weekend’s playoff matchup between the Chicago Bears and the Philadelphia Eagles will be the fourth time the teams have meet in the post season. Previous match-ups include the infamous “Fog Bowl” on New Year’s 1988, and the Eagles hold a 1-2 series advantage over the Bears. The teams will face off at Soldier Field at 3:40pm on Sunday.

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 –  rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

Budget, Govt Shutdown, Wall: Wealth Economic Update Dec. 31, 2018

U.S. and World News

  • wall-813556790The U.S. federal government will remain closed until after the new year as negotiations over a budget deal have made no progress. According to the Department of Agriculture, the new $12 billion trade aid relief package that includes government payments to farmers will be temporarily suspended as the federal shutdown continues. Also, some economic data figures normally published by the U.S. Commerce Department will not be published during this time. Negotiations for a budget deal remain at a standstill as President Trump refuses to budge on a deal without border security funding, while Democrats continue to strongly oppose funding a wall. Democrats will assume control of the House on January 3rd and have discussed plans for a budget deal, however, none of these plans include $5 billion for a border wall.


Markets

  • Stocks rebounded sharply this week after last week’s declines. The S&P 500 rose 2.89% and closed at 2,486. The Dow Jones jumped 2.75% and closed at 23,062. Year to date, the S&P is down 5.02% and the Dow Jones is down 4.39%.
  • Yields continued their declines this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.56% and 2.72%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil fell further this week. Prices fell 1.12% and closed at $45.08 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are down 25.00%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 1.76% this week and closed at $1,279.07 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are down 1.82%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims decreased by 1,000 to 216,000 for the week ended December 22nd from an upwardly revised 217,000. The four-week moving average of claims fell by 5,000 to 218,000. Claims rose by 4,000 in New Jersey and by 2,000 in California but fell by 2,000 in Michigan and Texas.
  • The Conference Board index of consumer confidence fell 8.3 points to 128.1 in December versus expectations for a reading of 133.5.
  • The FHFA house price index rose by 0.3% in October, in-line with expectations. The year-over-year rate declined to 5.7% from 6.1%.
  • Pending home sales fell by 0.7% in November, versus expectations for a 1.0% increase.

Fact of the Week

  •  On Wednesday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up 1086 points, a daily change of 4.98%. While it was the largest one day return in terms of points, it doesn’t even rank in the top 20 all time of daily percentage gains for the Dow Jones.

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

Stock Markets, Govt Shutdown: Wealth Economic Update Dec. 21, 2018

U.S. and World News

  • stocks-1023759644_370Equity markets continued their extended slide this week which is largely being attributed to the actions and commentary coming from the Federal Reserve. As mostly expected, the Fed raised interest rates another 0.25% this week, the fourth rate hike of 2018. Markets appear to take issue with comments made in the post-meeting press conference in which Fed Chair Jerome Powell downplayed the implications of market volatility and said that runoff of the Fed’s balance sheet is on ‘auto-pilot’. Despite taking projected rate hikes for 2019 down from 3 to 2, many fear the comments are indicative of a Fed that is steadfast in its plan to continue to raise rates regardless of the data both domestically and globally. For further information on the market action as of late, please see the note Old Second Wealth Management Comments on Market Volatility sent on December 20.
  • Also weighing on markets is an impending government shutdown, which is scheduled to take place unless an agreement is reached by midnight Friday. President Trump has refused to sign a stop-gap spending bill and threatened that the shutdown would last “for a very long time” unless there are provisions for funding the border wall along the Mexican border, something that Democrats appear unwilling to budge on. Government shutdowns have historically not been market moving events, but this time around it appears to be adding extra uncertainty to a market that is already dealing with very poor sentiment.


Markets

  • Stocks fell further this week amid global uncertainty, Federal Reserve concerns and a looming government shutdown with major averages suffering their worst weekly declines in 10 years. The S&P 500 fell 7.03% and closed at 2,417. The Dow Jones dropped 6.87% and closed at 22,445. Year to date, the S&P is down 7.64% and the Dow Jones is down 6.89%.
  • Bonds rallied this week with yields dropping along with stock prices. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are yielding 2.63% and 2.79%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil continued its precipitous slide this week on forecasts of record U.S. and Russian output combined with the sharp selloff in the equity markets. Prices fell 11.81% and closed at $45.39 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices are down 24.48%.
  • The spot price of Gold rose 1.37% this week and closed at $1,255.84 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are down 3.59%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims increased by 8,000 to 214,000 this week. The four-week moving average of claims fell by 3,000 to 222,000. Claims rose by 2,000 each in Pennsylvania, California, and New York.
  • Existing home sales increased 1.9% in the month of November, beating expectations of a -0.4% decline. Sales rose in the Northeast (+7.2%), Midwest (+5.5%), and South (+2.3%) and declined in the West (-6.3%).
  • The PCE Price Index (measure of inflation) rose by 0.06% in November, slightly higher than expectations of flat prices. Over the last 12 months, the headline PCE index has risen 1.8%.
    • The Core PCE Price Index (excludes food and energy prices) rose 0.15% in November, a bit below expectations of 0.2%. Over the last 12 month, Core PCE prices have risen 1.9%.

Fact of the Week

  • Last year, there were twice as many home owners created as were created in the previous 10 years combined. The number of U.S. homeowners grew by 1.8 million in the 12 months ending 6/30/2018, double the 900,000 new homeowners over the 10 year period ending 6/30/2017. (Source: Census Bureau)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com
Mike Demski – (630) 966-2430 mdemski@oldsecond.com
Mike Cava – (630) 281-4522 mcava@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC nor any govt agency; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.