Brexit: Wealth Economic Update Mar. 31, 2017

U.S. and World News

  • london360The Brexit process has officially begun as British Prime Minister Theresa May has invoked Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, formally informing the European Union of its exit from the bloc. The letter of declaration was hand-delivered to EU President Donald Tusk Wednesday and now begins what is estimated to be a two year negotiation process between the UK and all of the remaining 27 European Union member states. This is anticipated to be a difficult and lengthy procedure as agreements must be reached on tough issues such as trade and immigration.
  • Complicating matters in the United Kingdom is the fact that Scottish lawmakers voted 69-59 this week to seek a new referendum on independence within the next two years. This certainly comes as an unwelcome distraction from the Brexit proceedings for British leaders. First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon declared, “The mandate for a referendum is beyond question, and it would be democratically indefensible – and utterly unsustainable – to attempt to stand in the way of it.”

Markets

  • Markets closed the 1st quarter of 2017 on an up note. The S&P 500 gained 0.82% and closed at 2,363. The Dow Jones was also positive for the week rising 0.32% and closing at 20,597. Year to date, the S&P is up 6.06% and the Dow is up 5.18%.
  • Interest rates continued to decline a bit this week. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are now yielding 1.92% and 2.39%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil rose 5.82% this week, closing at $50.76 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices have fallen 5.51%.
  • The spot price of Gold increased by 0.38% this week, closing at $1,248.24 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 8.77%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims declined by 3,000 from last week, coming in at 258,000. The level of claims was likely affected for a second week by Winter Storm Stella. The four week moving average for claims rose to 254,000.
  • 4th Quarter GDP growth was revised up in the 3rd estimate from +1.9% to +2.1%, beating expectations of +2.0%. The main source of the upward revision was real consumer spending, which was revised up to +3.5% from +3.0% previously.
  • The Case-Schiller home price index rose by 0.9% in its latest reading, beating expectations of a 0.7% increase. Prices rose in all 20 cities measured except for Cleveland, with Seattle (+1.7%) and Chicago (+1.3%) seeing the largest increases in the month. Over the last 12 months, home prices as measured by the index have risen 5.7%.
  • The PCE index (measure of inflation) rose 0.1% in February, in line with consensus expectations. Over the last 12 months, PCE inflation has increased 2.1%, also in line with estimates.
    • Core PCE (excludes food and energy, Fed’s preferred inflation measure) rose 0.2% in February, meeting expectations. Over the last year, Core PCE has risen 1.75%, still below the Fed’s 2% inflation target.

Fact of the Week

  • 25 players will make the opening day rosters of the 30 Major League Baseball teams ahead of the season opening on Sunday night, a total of 750 big league ballplayers. Coming into this season, there have been a total of 18,593 men to appear in at least 1 game at the major league level. (Source: Major League Baseball)

PLAY BALL!!

 

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Jean Van Keppel CFA® – (630) 906-5489 jvankeppel@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Joel Binder, SVP – (630) 844-6767 jbinder@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz, VP – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

 

7 Tips For Raising Money-Smart Kids

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Carrie S. Niesman, Vice President/Regional Manager

As parents, we work hard to protect our kids. Even before they cross their first street, we start teaching them how to assess and address the risks that come with daily living.

When it comes to money, this can be a bigger challenge. It takes patience, discipline and repetition to become financially savvy. But, the earlier you start teaching them, the more likely it is they’ll be ready to make money-smart decisions by the time they receive their first paycheck.

Here are some tips for where and how to begin:

1. Lead by example. Even as they are seated in the cart at the grocery store, let them see you take your time to comparison shop and check for coupons before you choose a product. Ask for their help conducting online searches when making larger purchases. Help them understand that it isn’t as much about the amount of money you spend—even if you can afford it—as it is the value you receive for what you get.
2. Encourage them to start saving when they’re young. By kindergarten, kids are able to understand that it takes time to get what you want. Piggybanks are good learning tools for reinforcing this.
3. Stress the difference between wants and needs. Both understanding the difference and training yourself to only buy what you can afford once a “need” is established are keys to leading a prosperous life.
4. Let them see how saving works. The jar concept helps make the difference between short-term savings and long-term savings concrete and visible. Kids can see where their money goes and watch it accumulate. They may use one jar to save for a specific goal, like a video game that will be coming out in a few months. Then, they may have a jar for long-term savings, like the car they said they want to be able to buy when they turn 16 or their college education, a goal you want them to aspire to. Some parents have another jar for giving to reinforce a family’s belief that it’s important to think of and share with others. In my own family, we’ve used jars to save for family outings, which helped my kids understand how much it costs to have fun at a carnival!
5. Insist they pay themselves first. As children start to receive allowances and learn that doing extra chores—at home and for neighbors—can lead to extra cash, teach them the concept of paying themselves first. Encourage them to add some portion of their earnings to savings before spending the rest.
6. Bring them to the bank. Today, most adults rely on electronic banking and ATMs to handle their personal finances. However, it can help children understand where the money goes when it gets deposited and to see how it is withdrawn by literally taking them to the bank. Once they get the mechanics of how money flows into and out of their accounts, making the switch to electronic transfers and the use of debit cards can be much easier and less likely to result in overdraft charges or unnecessary fees.
7. Exercise care when using credit cards around children. To a child, paying with a credit card resembles waving a magic wand to get whatever you want, when you want it. If you aren’t using cash in their presence, try to let your children catch you doing your monthly bills to help them understand that the money to pay for those charged purchases is quite real and comes out of your account.

Where We Can Help
Moving money from jars and into savings account deposits also reinforces the notion of how savings builds over time. Similarly, letting kids review their statements and encouraging them to use calculators, like those offered on our website, can also help them understand what saving—and investing—looks like and where it leads over time.

Being a community bank, we are always available to meet with you and your children to answer any questions they may have and talk to them about the best way to meet their financial goals. Together, we can achieve a money-smart future.

Interest Rates, Brexit: Wealth Economic Update Mar. 20, 2017

U.S. and World News

  • In a highly anticipated move, the Federal Reserve raised the Fed Funds Rate by 0.25% this week. Despite being the second rate hike in three months, the Committee remained committed to a gradual pace of rate hikes going forward. The Fed projects two more interest rate hikes in 2017, though there are differing views among the members. There was one dissent, Neel Kashkari, who supported not raising at this meeting and taking a wait and see approach. Finally, it was noted by Fed Chair Janet Yellen that the size of the Fed’s balance sheet (which stands at $4.5 trillion) was discussed at the meeting, but no decisions were made in regard to reducing it over time.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May secured permission to trigger Article 50 which would officially mark the beginning of Brexit negotiations between the nation and its European Union counterparts. Having received the go-ahead from Parliament, May has said that she will invoke Article 50 by the end month. It’s expected that the negotiation process will last at least two years before Britain is officially able to leave the EU.

Markets

  • Markets closed the week moderately higher. The S&P 500 gained 0.28% and closed at 2,378. The Dow Jones followed suit by inching up 0.08% and closing at 20,915. Year to date, the S&P is up 6.71% and the Dow is up 6.45%.
  • Despite a 0.25% rate hike in the Fed Funds Rate, interest rates fell this week as the projected pace of future hikes was not accelerated. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are now yielding 2.02% and 2.50%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil stabilized this week and gained 0.47% this week, closing at $48.72 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices have fallen 9.31%.
  • The spot price of Gold increased by 2.04% this week, closing at $1,229.26 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 7.13%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims edged 2,000 lower from last week, coming in at 241,000. The Labor Department noted no special factors in the data. The four week moving average for claims remained at 237,000 which is a near a 40-year low.
  • Retail sales increased 0.1% in February, in line with expectations. Sales excluding autos and gasoline increased 0.2%. Delayed tax refunds appeared to bring down several Retail categories.
  • The Consumer Price Index (measure of inflation) increased 0.1% in February, slightly beating expectations for flat prices. Over the last 12 months, CPI has increased 2.7%.
    • Core CPI (excludes food and energy) rose 0.2% for February, in line with expectations. Core prices have risen 2.2% over the last year.
  • Housing starts increased by 3.0% in February, beating expectations of 1.1%. The details of the report were also favorable, as the less volatile single family starts increased by 6.5% to the highest level since October 2007 while multi-family starts decreased 3.7%.

Fact of the Week

  • The S&P 500 has now gone 108 consecutive trading days without suffering at least a 1% decline over any single trading day. That’s the longest stretch that the S&P has gone without a 1% drop since it had a run of 105 trading days without one that ended on December 15, 1995. (Source: By The Numbers Research)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Jean Van Keppel CFA® – (630) 906-5489 jvankeppel@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Joel Binder, SVP – (630) 844-6767 jbinder@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz, VP – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

 

NKorea/Japan, Healthcare: Wealth Economic Update Mar. 10, 2017

U.S. and World News

  • Global tensions are rising in the wake of North Korea firing four ballistic missiles into nearby waters over the weekend. Three of those missiles landed in Japan’s exclusive economic zone, causing the country to move to the highest possible alert level. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe declared, “This clearly shows North Korea has entered a new stage of threat.” Fearing a rapid escalation, China has called upon North Korea to stop its nuclear and missile tests and for South Korea and the U.S. to cease their joint military drills in the area.
  • Republican leaders in Congress unveiled their plan to repeal and replace Obamacare this week. Along with the end of the health insurance mandates, the proposal would restructure the Medicaid program and create a new tax credit tied to a person’s age and income for those who cannot get insurance through their employer. President Trump is “proud to endorse” the plan and called for its speedy passage despite some opposition within the Republican Party.

Markets

  • Markets fell a bit this week. The S&P 500 lost 0.40% and closed at 2,373. The Dow Jones followed suit by dipping 0.40% and closing at 20,903. Year to date, the S&P is up 6.41% and the Dow is up 6.36%.
  • Interest rates rose quite a bit this week as odds of a Fed rate hike next week have all but hit 100%. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are now yielding 2.10% and 2.58%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil plunged 9.38% this week, closing at $48.33 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices have fallen 10.03%.
  • The spot price of Gold decreased by 2.43% this week, closing at $1,204.74 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 4.99%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims bounced 20,000 higher from last week, coming in at 243,000. The Labor Department noted no special factors in the data. The four week moving average for claims now stands at 237,000 which is a near a 40-year low.
  • The February jobs report showed an increase of 235,000 new jobs created in the month, better than expectations of 200,000. The prior two months’ figures were revised up by a combined 8,000 which brings the three month average for job gains to 209,000 per month. The report was generally very positive, one blemish however was the 26,000 retail jobs lost during the month, continuing that sector’s recent struggles.
    • The headline unemployment rate ticked down to 4.7%, in line with expectations. The 0.1% decrease in the unemployment rate occurred despite a 0.1% increase in the labor force participation rate to 63.0%.
    • Average hourly earnings rose 0.2% in February, below forecasts of 0.3%. Over the last 12 months, wages have increased 2.8%.

Fact of the Week

  • The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) index turned 60 years old this week. The index is widely regarded as the most accurate gauge of large American stocks and it is market capitalization weighted as opposed to the Dow, which is weighted by price, or other indexes that have an equal weighting. The S&P 500 is by far the biggest index in the world, with about $2.4 trillion being tracked by it.

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Jean Van Keppel CFA® – (630) 906-5489 jvankeppel@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Joel Binder, SVP – (630) 844-6767 jbinder@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz, VP – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.

 

Trump speech, Fed, Sessions: Wealth Economic Update Mar. 6, 2017

U.S. and World News

  • politician_podium76797371_320President Trump delivered his first address to a joint session of Congress this week and spoke on a number of initiatives that the administration aims to put through. Trump pledged to overhaul the immigration system, improve jobs and wages for Americans, and promised “massive” tax relief to the middle class and tax cuts for businesses. Trump also laid out some general principles for an Obamacare replacement. Details on these items were absent from the address but Trump did say that he plans to ask Congress for $1 trillion in infrastructure investment, guided by the principle “Buy American and Hire American.”
  • The Federal Reserve came more into focus this week as Fed officials have indicated that there is a strong likelihood of a March interest rate hike. San Francisco Fed President John Williams said that an interest rate hike in March will be under “serious consideration” and New York’s William Dudley feels the case for tightening at the next meeting “has become a lot more compelling.” The market is now assigning a 94% chance of a Fed Funds Rate hike in March.
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions has announced that he will recuse himself from any investigations related to President Trump’s election campaign amid backlash over his testimony about his contacts with Russia. At Sessions’ confirmation hearing, during which he was under oath, he failed to disclose meeting with Russia’s ambassador on multiple occasions when asked about contact with the Russian government during Trump’s campaign.

Markets

  • Markets rose this week following President Trump’s address to Congress. The streak of 55 consecutive trading days without a trading range of +/- 1% in the S&P 500 was broken this week. The S&P 500 gained 0.71% and closed at 2,383. The Dow Jones followed suit by rising 0.94% and closing at 21,006. Year to date, the S&P is up 6.84% and the Dow is up 6.79%.
  • Interest rates rose quite a bit this week following the address to Congress and increased rate hike odds. The 5 year and 10 year U.S. Treasury Notes are now yielding 2.01% and 2.48%, respectively.
  • The spot price of WTI Crude Oil was down 1.39% this week, closing at $53.24 per barrel. Year to date, Oil prices have dipped 0.89%.
  • The spot price of Gold decreased by 1.78% this week, closing at $1,234.76 per ounce. Year to date, Gold prices are up 7.60%.

Economic Data

  • Initial jobless claims fell 19,000 from last week, coming in at 223,000 which is the lowest reading since 1973. The Labor Department noted no special factors in the data. The four week moving average for claims now stands at 234,000 which is a new 40-year low.
  • The Case-Shiller home price index rose by 0.9% in its latest reading, slightly beating expectations of a 0.7% increase. Prices rose in all 20 cities covered and the largest monthly increases were seen in Chicago (1.5%), Seattle (1.4%) and Tampa (1.4%). Over the last 12 months, home prices as measured by Case-Shiller have risen 5.6%.
  • The Headline PCE index (measure of inflation) rose 0.4% in January, slightly under expectations of 0.5%. Over the last year, prices as measure by PCE have increased 1.9%.
    • Core PCE (excludes food and energy, preferred inflation measure by the Fed) increased 0.3% in January, in line with expectations. Over the last year, Core PCE has risen 1.7%, still a bit below the Federal Reserve’s 2% target.

 

Fact of the Week

  • Over the last 30 years, the proportion of all US workers that were members of a union has fallen from 17.5% to 10.7%. Looking at just private sector workers, union membership has fallen from 14.0% in 1986 to just 6.4% now. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Please contact a member of the Wealth Management Department if you have any questions about this information.

Rich Gartelmann CFP® – (630) 844-5730 rgartelmann@oldsecond.com
Steve Meves, CFA® – (630) 801-2217 – smeves@oldsecond.com
Jean Van Keppel CFA® – (630) 906-5489 jvankeppel@oldsecond.com
Brad Johnson CFA®, CFP® – (630) 906-5545 bjohnson@oldsecond.com
Joel Binder, SVP – (630) 844-6767 jbinder@oldsecond.com
Jacqueline Runnberg CFP® – (630) 966-2462 jrunnberg@oldsecond.com
Ed Gorenz, VP – (630) 906-5467 ejgorenz@oldsecond.com

Visit Old Second Wealth Management

Non-deposit investment products are not insured by the FDIC; not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank; may lose value.